Warm Southern Breeze

"… there is no such thing as nothing."

Shaping Up Is An Ongoing Process

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Saturday, November 4, 2017

St. Charles Borromeo 1538-84 Administering The Sacrament To Plague Victims In Milan In 1576, Oil wood print, by Pierre Mignard (1612-95), a French painter known for his religious and mythological scenes and portraits.

Saint Charles Borromeo (1538-1584) was an instrument of the Holy Spirit in helping to keep the church on course through needed reforms in the 16th century. Had he been a participant in the Second Vatican Council rather than the Council of Trent, he may have contributed to Vatican II’s similar insight on the need for reform: “Christ summons the church, as she goes her pilgrim way, to that continual reformation of which she always has need, insofar as she is an institution of men here on earth,” stated the Decree on Ecumenism written in 1964 at the Second Vatican Council. The Church demonstrates ecumenism by refraining from insulting other denominations, honest dialogue, and participation in service to humanity. Rooted in holiness, it is sustained by prayerfulness and humility. Many aspects of daily Christian life also bear witness to our communion, including daily prayer, community worship, Bible studies, Christian family life, and shared principles of justice and charity. We have much to offer one another. A shared belief in Christ as the Son of God, and reverence for Sacred Scripture are two basic components of unity for all.

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