Warm Southern Breeze

"… there is no such thing as nothing."

USC SoM Professor: “There’s life there” on Mars!

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Friday, April 13, 2012

It’s official now.

Scientists have re-examined 36-year old data from NASA’s Viking mission to Mars, and claim to have found alien life based on the complexity of experimental results.

Great.

Any damn fool can to a bar or nightclub on the weekend and find genuinely alien life, and in the process, become alienated themselves.

Doubtless, by comparison, their problems are genuinely complex (or so they think), by comparison to those of others.

Say… Jackie Gleason wanted to sent Alice “to the moon!”

And now, we’ve been.

Didn’t George W. Bush say he wanted to go to Mars?

Maybe we could send him.

Mars Viking Robots ‘Found Life’

Mathematical analysis adds to growing body of work questioning the negative results of a life-detection experiment 36 years ago.

By Irene Klotz
Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:23 PM ET

THE GIST
•    New results question the finding that the Mars Viking experiments did not find life.
•    The analysis was based on studying the mathematically complexity of the experiment results.
•    The idea is that living systems are more complicated than purely physical ones, a concept that can be represented mathematically.

NASA's Viking Lander on Mars 1976

April 12, 2012 -- Viking 2 Lander image (dated Nov. 2, 1976) showing the rocks of Utopia Planitia in the background.

Viking 2 Lander image (dated Nov. 2, 1976) showing the rocks of Utopia Planitia in the background. Click to enlarge this image. 
NASA

New analysis of 36-year-old data, resuscitated from printouts, shows NASA found life on Mars, an international team of mathematicians and scientists conclude in a paper published this week.

Further, NASA doesn’t need a human expedition to Mars to nail down the claim, neuropharmacologist and biologist Joseph Miller, with the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, told Discovery News.

“The ultimate proof is to take a video of a Martian bacteria. They should send a microscope — watch the bacteria move,” Miller said.

“On the basis of what we’ve done so far, I’d say I’m 99 percent sure there’s life there,” he added.

Miller’s confidence stems in part from a new study that re-analyzed results from a life-detection experiment conducted by NASA’s Viking Mars robots in 1976.

Researchers crunched raw data collected during runs of the Labeled Release experiment, which looked for signs of microbial metabolism in soil samples scooped up and processed by the two Viking landers. General consensus of scientists has been that the experiment found geological, not biological, activity.

The new study took a different approach. Researchers distilled the Viking Labeled Release data, provided as hard copies by the original researchers, into sets of numbers and analyzed the results for complexity. Since living systems are more complicated than non-biological processes, the idea was to look at the experiment results from a purely numerical perspective.

They found close correlations between the Viking experiment results’ complexity and those of terrestrial biological data sets. They say the high degree of order is more characteristic of biological, rather than purely physical processes.

Critics counter that the method has not yet been proven effective for differentiating between biological and non-biological processes on Earth so it’s premature to draw any conclusions.

“Ideally to use a technique on data from Mars one would want to show that the technique has been well calibrated and well established on Earth. The need to do so is clear; on Mars we have no way to test the method, while on Earth we can,” planetary scientist and astrobiologist Christopher McKay, with NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., told Discovery News.

While not iron-clad, Miller says the findings are an additional plank of evidence challenging the popularly contention that Viking did not find life.

He also is reanalyzing the data to see if there are variations when sunlight was blocked by a weeks-long dust storm on Mars, with the idea being that biological systems would have acted differently to the environmental change than geologic ones. Results of the research are expected to be presented in August.

The research is published online in the International Journal of Aeronautical and Space Sciences.

http://news.discovery.com/space/mars-life-viking-landers-discovery-120412.html

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