Warm Southern Breeze

"… there is no such thing as nothing."

Posts Tagged ‘Nurse’

UK Nurse Punk’d on Royal Family Pregnancy Commits Suicide

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Friday, December 7, 2012

While it was meant all in harmless fun, I sincerely doubt that the individual’s response  – to commit suicide – was anything other than an inappropriate response to jesting in good-hearted intent.

It is indeed tragic that the nurse committed suicide.

Perhaps there were other underlying issues, or an inability to cope that predicated her distressing response.

One simply cannot hold others responsible for everything. As tragic as this story is, one must accept responsibility for one’s own actions.


The New York Times
December 7, 2012

Prank Call Seeking Royal Family Secrets Takes Horrifying Turn

By

LONDON — As pranks go, this one appeared outrageous and obnoxious rather than malicious: after convincing a hospital nurse who answered the phone this week that they were Queen Elizabeth and Prince Charles, two Australian radio hosts then tricked another nurse into disclosing medical information about the pregnant Duchess of Cambridge, who had been admitted with acute morning sickness.

The call was broadcast on Australia radio; then it went out around the world.

But the stunt took a horrific and unexpected turn on Friday, when the nurse who answered the call, 46-year-old Jacintha Saldanha, was found dead, an apparent suicide.

The Metropolitan Police would not release details of the death, except to say that they had received a call reporting that there was an unconscious woman at Weymouth Street, in central London, and two ambulance crews had arrived to find Mrs. Saldanha already dead. A police spokesman said they were not treating the death as suspicious.

It was unclear what exactly had happened since the prank itself to make Mrs. Saldanha, who was reportedly married and had two children, take her life. King Edward VII’s Hospital, where she worked, said it had not disciplined her, but rather had been “supporting her during this difficult time.” Nor, apparently, had the royal family raised a fuss with the hospital, an exclusive private institution that has long been the hospital of choice for Britain’s royals.

“At no point did the palace complain to the hospital about the incident,” a spokesman for St. James’s Palace said. “On the contrary, we offered our full and heartfelt support to the nurses involved and the hospital staff at all times.”

The turn of events was seen as so shocking that it provoked a response from even the prime minister of Australia, Julia Gillard, who called it “a terrible tragedy.”

Whatever the immediate impetus for Mrs. Saldanha’s death, the episode was Read the rest of this entry »

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Nursing shortage could be compounded by faculty shortage

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Friday, August 3, 2012

One of the inevitable consequences of an aging population is the loss of their significant contribution and influence upon society from myriad perspectives.

To account and plan for such inevitabilities is not simply wise, but rather, it is common sense and a hallmark of effective and competent management.

Having been warned of the potential for crisis, we would be wise to double down on solutions.

Nursing Schools Brace For Faculty Shortage

by Sandy Hausman, WVTF

Listen to the Story Morning Edition; August 3, 2012; [4 min 16 sec] Download; 04:43 am

There have been lots of goodbye parties this year at the University of Virginia School of Nursing. So far, eleven professors have retired. That’s one-fourth of the faculty, and Dean Dorrie Fontaine is in no mood to celebrate.

nursingstudents

Nursing students in a simulation lab at the University of Virginia School of Nursing. Photo by: Elizabeth Lee Cantrell/UVA School of Nursing

Over the next few years, the Affordable Care Act will probably boost demand for nurses to take care of the newly-insured, she says, “And I need faculty to teach the practitioners that are going to take care of these uninsured.”

In the last year, more than 76,000 qualified applicants were turned away, in large part because nursing schools didn’t have enough professors. Polly Bednash heads the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. She explains that nurses comprise the oldest workforce in the nation, and many of them kept working during the recession.

“They are going to leave in droves and are already leaving in some places where the economy is getting better,” she says.

Finding professors to Read the rest of this entry »

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Where the Jobs Are: Is the Nursing Job Market a mixed bag?

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Eminent nursing researcher & scholar Dr. Peter Buerhaus, PhD, RN, FAAN has made a career studying Nurses, and suggests that the jobs picture for new nurse grads is good, and that they may be facing one of the best job markets in decades.

A 2009 study he conducted found that, “Registered nurse (RN) employment has increased during the current recession, and we may soon see an end to the decade-long nurse shortage. This would give hospitals welcome relief and an opportunity to strengthen the nurse workforce by addressing issues associated with an increasingly older and foreign-born workforce. The recent increase in employment is also improving projections of the future supply of RNs, yet large shortages are still expected in the next decade. Until nursing education capacity is increased, future imbalances in the nurse labor market will be unavoidable.

A 2004 study of his said that, “Wage increases, relatively high national unemployment, and widespread private-sector initiatives aimed at increasing the number of people who become nurses has resulted in a second straight year of strong employment growth among registered nurses (RNs). In 2003, older women and, to a lesser extent, foreign-born RNs accounted for a large share of employment growth. We also observe unusually large employment growth from two new demographic groups: younger people, particularly women in their early thirties, and men. Yet, despite the increase in employment of nearly 185,000 hospital RNs since 2001, the evidence suggests that the current nurse shortage has not been eliminated.

Most recently, research he worked upon which was published in the December 2011 issue of Health Affairs found that “because of this surge in the number of young people entering nursing during the past decade, the nurse workforce is projected to grow faster during the next two decades than previously anticipated.”

In essence, “...the nurse workforce is now expected to grow at roughly the same rate as the population through 2030.”

They also cautioned however, “that the dynamics of the nursing workforce are more complex than sheer numbers.

Lead researcher and RAND health economist David Auerbach said, “Instead of worrying about a decline, we are now growing the supply of nurses.

Here’s something very interesting, however.

In that same issue of Health Affairs, a survey conducted by Christine Kovner of New York University examined the low “mobility” of new RNs. The most striking finding was that Read the rest of this entry »

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UPDATED: Army Nurse Dies in Afghanistan while Off Duty

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Sunday, May 6, 2012

UPDATE: Monday, 07 May 2012

Army officials have not yet released the 43-year-old Nurse/Soldier’s cause of death, but confirmed Monday that he was not shot.

Spokeswoman Chris Grey said, “Although the investigation into his death is open and ongoing by Special Agents from the US Army Criminal Investigation Command, we can positively say that Captain Clark was not shot. Agents conducting the investigation, found no trauma to the body beyond minor abrasions and a possible broken nose most likely caused from Captain Clark striking his face on his desk when he collapsed. Investigators will continue to probe the death but they do not “suspect foul play.”

Beaumont Army Medical Center Public Affars Officer Clarence Davis said the cause of death has not been determined, and that “The autopsy and investigation will reveal the cause of death.”

According to CPT Clark’s brother Justin Hallenbeck, he even spent time as a volunteer firefighter.

CPT Clark was a part of A Company, Troop Command at Beaumont, and deployed to Afghanistan in March.

He was stationed in Tarin Kowt, Afghanistan, which was described by Army officials as a town of about 10,000 people.

His awards include the Army Commendation Award, Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and the Army Service Medal.

It’s still a dangerous place in Afghanistan, as this story testifies.

Oh yes… men make great nurses, and in the Armed Services all RNs are officers.

May his family be comforted during their time of grief.

Army officer dies during Skype chat with wife

May 6, 2012 8:23 PM
Captain Bruce Kevin Clark, RN - United States Army, Nurse Corps

US Army CPT Bruce Kevin Clark, RN was thought to have been killed by a bullet in Afghanistan while off-duty during a Skype video conference session with his wife, who is stateside.

(AP) HOUSTON – The wife of an Army officer serving in Afghanistan witnessed her husband’s death as the two video chatted via Skype, his family said Friday.

The circumstances of Capt. Bruce Kevin Clark’s death were not immediately available. The Pentagon said it was under investigation, and his brother-in-law said he didn’t have details.

“We are entrusting the military with investigating and with finding out what happened to Capt. Clark,” Bradley Taber-Thomas told The Associated Press.

Clark, a 43-year-old Army chief nurse, grew up in Michigan and lived previously in Spencerport, N.Y., a suburb of Rochester and his wife’s hometown. He joined the Army in 2006 and was stationed in Hawaii before he was assigned to the William Beaumont Army Medical Center in El Paso. He deployed to Afghanistan in March.

A statement from the family released by Taber-Thomas said Clark died Monday while Read the rest of this entry »

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What happens when physician pay is tied to efficiency & quality?

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Monday, April 16, 2012

What would it be like if you were paid for your success?

What would it be like if you were rewarded for high efficiency?

Is it possible that successful patient outcomes could be correlated to compensation?

How would one measure non-compliant patients, or those with poor prognoses?

Medicare moves to tie doctors’ pay to quality and cost of care

By Jordan Rau, jrau@kff.org Published: April 14

CMS plans to base the 2015 bonuses or penalties on what happens to a doctor's patients during 2013.

Twenty-thousand physicians in four Midwest states received a glimpse into their financial future last month. Landing in their e-mail inboxes were links to reports from Medicare showing the amount their patients cost on average as well as the quality of the care they provided. The reports also showed how Medicare spending on each doctor’s patients compared with their peers in Kansas, Iowa, Missouri and Nebraska.

The “resource use” reports, which Medicare plans to eventually provide to doctors nationwide, are one of the most visible phases of the government’s effort to figure out how to enact a complex, delicate and little-noticed provision of the 2010 health-care law: paying more to doctors who provide quality care at lower cost to Medicare, and reducing payments to physicians who run up Medicare’s costs without better results.

Making providers routinely pay attention to cost and quality is widely viewed as crucial if the country is going to rein in its health-care spending, which amounts to more than $2.5 trillion a year. It’s also key to keeping Medicare solvent. Efforts have begun to change the way Medicare pays hospitals, doctors and other providers who agree to work together in new alliances known as “accountable care organizations.” This fall, the federal health program for 47 million seniors and disabled people also is adjusting hospital payments based on quality of care, and it plans to take cost into account as early as next year.

But applying these same precepts to doctors is Read the rest of this entry »

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Registered Nurse job aboard private Mediterranean Yacht

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Sunday, November 27, 2011

How would you like to be an Registered Nurse based out of London, work aboard a Private Yacht traveling the Mediterranean earning a tax-free salary, paid housing, health insurance and flight?

If you’re a female – sorry guys – here’s your chance!

Salary, based upon current rate of exchange, is $57, 283/year with a one year contract.

More details and application below… Read the rest of this entry »

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Rhode Island Nurses May Strike; Short Term Contracts Available

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Monday, May 23, 2011

Registered Nurses to provide Patient Care during a possible labor dispute in Rhode Island, which is also a participating state in the Nurse Licensure Compact.

The pay rate for this short term assignment is Read the rest of this entry »

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New Registered Nurse Grads Face Tough Job Market

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Sunday, March 20, 2011

For the first time in many years, new Registered Nurse graduates face a contracted job market, and may face tough employment prospects, adding to an already dismal national economic portrait.

Researchers such as Vanderbilt University’s Dr. Peter Buerhaus, PhD, RN, FAAN, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and others have warned about the impending Nursing shortage. However, because of the poor overall economic conditions of the United States, many experienced RNs have foregone retirement, and or have come out of semi-retirement or translated part-time and PRN jobs into full-time status and have therefore made many hospitals flush with Nurses.

Previously, many experienced Nurses would have taken PRN (Latin for “pro re nata,” meaning “as needed”) or part-time positions, working anywhere from one shift every two weeks, 12 hours weekly, or in some cases no more than 24 hours weekly at most. Most Nurses are hospital-based employees, and work 12-hour shifts, and a typical full-time work week for Nurses is three, 12-hour shifts in a 7-day (one week) period.

Nursing has been, and continues to be a predominately female-populated profession, so the indicator of hospitals flush with Nurses is indeed a fascinating observation on at least two accounts. It speaks volumes about dire national economic conditions because women have found themselves in the unenviable position of having to work, and in many cases being their family’s primary breadwinner.

In an article published by Alabama & New Jersey’s State Nurses Association, Dr. Buerhaus shared his perspective on “The Short and Long-term Outlook for Registered Nurses in the US.” He wrote in part that once the jobs recovery begins and RN’s spouses return to work, many currently employed RNs could leave the workforce.

He noted further that while RNs’ employment prospects continue to be… To read more, click here.

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My Abortion Story

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Thursday, April 22, 2010

I’m a Registered Nurse.

I’m a man.

Here’s my abortion story. …Continue…

Posted in - Faith, Religion, Goodness - What is the Soul of a man? | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Good News! California’s Nurse:Patient Ratio Law Saves Lives!

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Extra! Extra!

Read all about it!

Should that, or

“Told ‘ya so!”

be the cry?

California and her residents, often maligned within and without, on occasion do come up with some good ideas.

Here’s one of the better ones. …Continue…you REALLY DO want to read this!

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Is there a Doctor (of Nursing) in the house?

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Saturday, April 17, 2010

I recollect one day, several years ago, at a then-small, rural community/junior college where I began my higher education, while walking across a parking lot, that I greeted an administrator whom I saw.

Hello, Dr. Gudger!,” I cheerily greeted him.

Good morning!,” came his reply.

Just then, another student, unknown to me or Dr. Gudger, called out, “Doctor! Oh, doctor! I have a question about my mama’s ...”

I’m sorry I can’t help you. I’m not that kind of doctor,” replied Dr. Gudger, as he turned and looked the student in the eye.

At the time, I thought it rather odd, then quickly considered that the fellow – likely from a very rural and poor background – was there to obtain an education. And so in part, he was schooled that day.

However, interesting stories aside, as healthcare goes, our nation is experiencing a significantly decreasing interest in rural healthcare practice, as well as family practice, followed by internal medicine.

Now, I realize that some would pooh-pooh lawyers and blame law suits (everybody hates lawyers… until they need one), claiming that sue-happy folk are to blame for the problems. However, while law suits may have a role – albeit an insignificant one – insurance companies are probably more to blame for increased costs of healthcare and rationing the delivery of health related services.

It’s really rather easy to understand: Anytime anyone gets in between you and the checkout stand, you’re gonna’ pay more. From a fiscal perspective, that’s essentially what happens.

Now, while I could drone on and on about the hows and whys that the insurance industry is (in my opinion) corrupt (the federal government has also bailed them out, along with banks – which, along with stock brokerage houses enjoy an incestuous fiscal orgy), and has corrupted whatever thing their hand touches, I shall confine my remarks toward the more germane and problematic topic at hand, which is the shortage of healthcare delivery to rural areas, and among the poor. …Continue…

Posted in - Even MORE Uncategorized!, - My Hometown is the sweetest place I know, - Politics... that "dirty" little "game" that first begins in the home., - Read 'em and weep: The Daily News | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

Huntsville Hospital… all that AND a bag of chips? Wow! …NOT QUITE!

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Monday, March 22, 2010

Most folks don’t know it, but Huntsville Hospital is NOT, has not ever been, does not meet criteria for, and is not making any plans to obtain or become:

1.) a certified or verified Trauma Center;
2.) meet the a) American College of Surgeons, or, b) American Trauma Society qualifications for Trauma Center status;
3.) an Academic Medical Center;
4.) university affiliate;
5.) teaching hospital;
6.) research center; nor
7.) Nursing Magnet Hospital.

So what? What does that mean for you, your family, friends and others in this part of the Tennessee Valley? …Continue…

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NCLEX Nurse Entrance Exam Gets Tougher

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Studies continue to demonstrate that among all professions (jobs for which one has specific higher education, must be licensed often at a state level, and typically has continuing education requirements), Nurses continue to be held in highest esteem. And, rightfully so.

Nursing is not just hand holding and bedpan emptying, although there is a component of that in almost every nursing assignment.

Now Nursing Students will become even more challenged – as right they should. Increasing burdens call for increasing competency, and hardly anyone could disagree with “raising the bar” for entrance just a wee bit higher… particularly when your life depends upon it! …Continue…

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More than enough

Posted by Warm Southern Breeze on Tuesday, February 9, 2010

I have a confession to make.

I recognize that I must confess to… well, I must confess to… to… to…

Not being exactly sure about how to proceed, I suppose it might be wise to be honest.

On occasion throughout my life, I have periodically engaged in …Continue…

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